Articles Posted in Parental Alienation

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How do you deal with parental alienation of your child knowing that the “other” parent is coaching the child to say and do things negatively against you. You know that the “other” parent is pitting the child against you and tell the child to tell you he/she doesn’t want to go visit you? This acts are just so heart breaking. It’s not only damaging to the parents’ relationship with the child but damaging to the child. Parental Alienation Syndrome (#PAS) is a common issue we face here in Orange County.

Here are some examples of parental alienation:

1- When the child expresses unjustified hatred or unreasonably dislike of one parent. Thus, making “access” by the rejected parent difficult to the child. This arises because the other parent makes negative comments or disparaging comments about the victimized parent.

How do you deal with parental alienation of your child knowing that the “other” parent is coaching the child to say and do things negatively against you. You know that the “other” parent is pitting the child against you and tell the child to tell you he/she doesn’t want to go visit you? This acts are just so heart breaking. It’s not only damaging to the parents’ relationship with the child but damaging to the child. Parental Alienation Syndrome (PAS) is a common issue we face here in Orange County.

Here are some examples of parental alienation:

1- When the child expresses unjustified hatred or unreasonably dislike of one parent. Thus, making “access” by the rejected parent difficult to the child. This arises because the other parent makes negative comments or disparaging comments about the victimized parent.

Do you have a father’s rights concern in Orange County? Orange County Divorce Lawyer, David P. Schwarz, can help you fight for your rights.

You typically need an Orange County Father’s Rights lawyer if you are being alienated away from your child. Does the other parent pit you against your child? Does the other parent speak negatively about you to the child? Does the other parent discuss court proceedings with the child? Are you constantly being denied visitation for no reason? Does the other parent “coach” the child what to say and how to act when they are in your care? Does the other parent want you to have nothing to do with the child? These are clear examples of parental alienation.

The issue of parental alienation is interlinked with a father’s rights attorney because most of the times father’s need their rights and need aggressive representation because the other parent has been alienating the child or children away from them.

How do you deal with parental alienation of your child? This is a common issue in Orange County and Los Angeles. Here are some examples of parental alienation:

1- When the child expresses unjustified hatred or unreasonably dislike of one parent. Thus, making “access” by the rejected parent difficult to the child. This arises because the other parent makes negative comments or disparaging comments about the victimized parent.

2- The parent creating the negativity is referred to as the “toxic” parent.

California parents have a right to meaningful relationships with their children. This does not mean that only the primary custodial parent has a right to spend time with his or her children. It does not mean that only mothers or only fathers have rights. It means that both parents deserve quality time with their kids.

At The Law Office of David P. Schwarz, I have over a decade of experience fighting for Orange County parents who are facing the threat of losing their relationship with their children. Do not let your child’s other parent deny you visitation or change your child’s image of you. Call 714-361-9875 or toll-free 877-387-7112 or contact me online to schedule a complimentary consultation.

I am passionate about helping mothers and fathers who feel alienated from their children. As an experienced lawyer, I have helped parents in many situations. Maybe your ex-spouse is using your children as leverage against you. Perhaps your children’s other parent has brainwashed them to think poorly of you. Or maybe he or she is threatening to move to a new state with the kids.

Several media outlets, including CNN, have recently highlighted an academic paper that floats a jarring idea: the article in the Journal of the American Medical Association argues that in certain circumstances “severely obese children be removed from their homes, and that government involvement may be justifiable because of the imminent health risks and the parents chronic failure to address medical problems.”

In other words, the authors argue that allowing your child to become obese is a form of child abuse, and should be treated as such by the courts.

From the perspective of an Orange County family law and child custody attorney the best that can be said about proposals like this is that they are obviously well-intentioned. Childhood obesity is a well-documented, and growing, problem in our country. Moreover, the examples cited by the authors and by CNN – a 90 lb toddler, a 400 pound 12-year-old – are, indeed, shocking. The problem would come when decisions had to be made about children who are overweight but in no imminent physical danger. The argument being made by the authors could easily be extended by analogy to eating disorders, creating an implication that California parents’ rights somehow end (or are at least to be curtailed) as soon as a child is judged to have a less-than-perfect diet.

A bill currently being considered by the California legislature would make significant changes to the way California child dependency hearings are conducted in the state. This crucial aspect of California family law is not widely understood, and merits closer examination.

According to Capitol Weekly, a publication focused on politics and government in Sacramento, hearings in California’s dependency courts “are considered “presumptively closed” – that is, members of the public and the press are barred unless a judge feels there is a compelling reason to open a hearing up.” Dependency Courts are a special sub-set of the broader California court system that hear cases dealing with the foster care system and with California child custody issues stemming from alleged abuse and/or neglect.

As Capitol Weekly notes, “the rational for having closed courts is to protect vulnerable children.” But backers of AB 73, a bill seeking to make dependency court hearings presumptively open, take the view that public scrutiny is essential for preventing miscarriages of justice. The Weekly notes that there is no uniform national standard for openness in dependency courts – only in Oregon and Pennsylvania are dependency hearings always open – but that “the pendulum appears to be shifting towards more open courts” nationally, especially here in the western states. A recent opinion piece in the San Francisco Chronicle put forward the view that greater scrutiny of the dependency courts will provide an extra layer of insurance against ill-considered rulings.

At the time of his divorce comedian and game show host Steve Harvey was widely portrayed as the Bad Guy. Now, according to E! Online, newly released legal documents appear to paint a somewhat different picture. The story is a cautionary tale for couples going through an Orange County divorce: a reminder of the degree to which a seemingly closed case can return to make one’s life difficult.

Harvey and his wife second Mary divorced in Texas in 2005 after ten years of marriage. Last month – more than a half-decade later – she took to YouTube with what E! calls a “lengthy, vitriolic” rant alleging that he cheated on her, alienated their son and left her broke and homeless. The entertainment magazine/website reports that Harvey, to his credit, refused to respond in kind, and instead went back to court seeking the temporary suspension of a gag order imposed on both sides as one condition of the couple’s settlement.

The verdict is that if Mary is now destitute she clearly has no one but herself to blame. The papers document four years of support at the level of $40,000 per month, followed by a one-time lump sum payment by Harvey of $1.5 million. As for being homeless, she received three (yes, three) of the couple’s homes under the terms of the agreement.

There is no question that Orange County parental alienation can be both emotional and frustrating, particularly for fathers who may come to believe that our court system does not do all it can to protect California and Orange County fathers’ rights. In Florida at the moment, however, a case is playing out that offers a painful example of personal frustration running out of control.

According to a report in the Daytona Beach News-Journal, James Wardner has grown so incensed with what he believes is unfair treatment by the courts in a custody battle over his five children that he has hired protestors to picket both the county courthouse and the offices of his ex-wife’s attorneys.

According to the paper, Wardner, a dentist, and his wife divorced in 2004. Since then he has seen his child support payments rise from $1800 per month to “just under $4000.” During that same period, the paper reports, “he claimed in court documents that his ex-wife systematically tried to cut him out of their children’s lives.” He is currently involved in a legal battle with his ex, seeking either full custody of the children or a significant reduction in his child support payments. A psychologist hired by Wardner concluded the children’s mother “engaged in a deliberate campaign to alienate the children from their father,” – a charge she denies.