Terrence Howard‘s taking an “L” in his longstanding spousal support war with his ex-wife … who just won in appeals court. This divorce case of Terrence Howard has been going on for years.  This shows how a case in the Family law court system can last as it seems forever.  A case such as Howard’s should make a person involved in a divorce reflect is it really worth it to drag a case out for years to achieve exactly what? To lose money? Im sure Terrence lost thousands paying his family law attorneys and his appellate lawyers to drag a case out for spite and contempt of heart.  Noone wins in cases that drag out over years to fight and fight and win absolutely nothing but lose thousands to the Family Court system.

In Terrence Howard’s case he chose to fight a payment of spousal support to his ex wife.  Often the appellate process can take years because of the nature of the appellate process in the Superior Court system. Often the Trial Court family law judges are permitted what is called broad discretion to handle their family law cases such as spousal support. Since the appellate three judge panel is permitted broad discretion to rule on spousal support matters that makes it difficult for an appellate court to overturn cases that the trial judge ruled on.

According to court docs, Michelle Ghent Howard got a ruling on their spousal support overturned. Two years ago, Terrence convinced the court he’d been forced to sign their marital settlement under duress. He claimed she was threatening to go public with naked photos and videos. Interestingly, Terrence claimed the threat of putting nude photos of himself on the web was enough to coerce him into signing a contract.  Often when once thinks of duress they think of someone facing physical or severe emotional harm. Terrence claims duress was fear of nude photos of himself leaked.  Often the defense to a signing of any contract in the State of California would be duress or coercion.  In addition, if a party claims they did not sign a contract without their consent it could be a plausible defense to signing the contract.

Blac China and Robert Kardashian broke up in July of 2017 after a tumultuous relationship.  Blac Chyna went to Court and got a Domestic violence restraining order against the father of her child. But their battle is far from over. While the mother-of-two was ready to go to war with her ex after he posted nude photos of her online without her permission, little did she and her lawyer Lisa Bloom know that the reclusive star had his counter-attack ready! And his youngest sister Kylie Jenner made sure to have his back as well. At the domestic violence hearing the couple entered into a child support and child custody order and avoid further domestic violence litigation in family law court.

What Robert Kardashian has decided to do is take his case outside of the criminal and or family law setting and used the civil litigation path to attack and financially go after Blac Chyna the the mother of his child Dream. The sneaky thing about the lawsuit Robert Kardashian filed is it will have nothing to do about family law matters such as child custody, child support and domestic violence.  It will only go after financial compensation.  Also a civil lawsuit can  go on much longer than a child custody and child support case.   If it cannot settle then the case will be set for a trial.  It can be set for a jury trial and have 12 people decide the damages.  Therefore, Blac Chyna could be in for a long drawn out process she thought was over after they settled their child custody and child support disputes in family law court. In family law Court there is not such thing as a jury trial only in a civil litigation setting can a jury trial be done.  In family law there is only a judge by trial case.  No Jury.

Rob must have seen their demise coming, because according to their complaint, he documented an incident back in December 2016 when Chyna allegedly abused him while “extremely intoxicated on drugs and alcohol.” She allegedly took one of his guns and was “carelessly playing” with it “unaware if the gun was loaded or if the safety was on,” the complaint states, according to People. It didn’t end there. Rob also claims she tried to choke him later that evening, using not her hands, but an iPhone cord, and he “suffered injuries to his neck.” Chyna wasn’t done; she then chased him and “repeatedly struck him in the head and face.” After Rob ended up outside the home, he attempted to escape in his Bentley, according to the complaint, which caused her to throw “a nearby chair at Rob’s car causing damage to the vehicle and also used a metal rod to injure Rob.” But Chyna did not just take her anger out on Rob. She also destroyed Kylie’s home, which is where the alleged violence took place. Rob claims she owes $100,000 for “damaging a television, breaking down a door, damaging the walls, destroying cells phones and smashing a gingerbread house that was made for the holidays.”

 

Can A Gay man use the IRS deductions for medical expenses and deduct for his in vitro fertilization procedure and its costs? In a short answer no.  A Homosexual man in Florida attempted to deduct all his costs for housing and caring for a lady who held his baby as a surrogate.  The complicated litigation that followed in the appellate Courts is quite unique and involves heavy use of the IRC.  Mr. Morrissey the sperm donor argued that the IRS had special deductions for him and that all expenses related to the in vitro fertilization process should be deductible.  Mr. Morrisey speant thousands of dollars on the whole process.  He basically took care of the egg donor and the surrogate during the times of the pregnancy.  He claimed that a man cannot house the baby therefore he had to spend all this money and it related the medical care costs. Mr. Morrisey in order to get the tax deduction on the caring for the surrogate argued that he himself suffered through the health care needs during the pregnancy process as he was the sperm donor and therefore was somehow apart of the reproductive process and thus should be permitted a huge deduction from the IRS.

The IRC section 213 states that if Mr. Morriseys body was effected by the in vitro fertilization process he could claim a deduction of the $55,000 he paid to get the process of finding a lady and transferring his sperm to her and the process of her getting the egg to inseminate.

The circuit Court of Florida found Mr. Morriseys argument specious and without real merit because his involvement in the in vitro fertilization process was limited at best.  The Court argued that he was like every other male a donor of sperm and had limited biological contribution to the production of the baby.   The male reproductive position in creating a baby was really a donor sperm and not more than that.  The female had to do a lot more on her end as far as creating the baby.  They had to hold the egg and then pass the egg to the uterous and house the baby for 9 months which the male counterpart did not.  Thust the application of IRC 213 did not apply.

Eighteen Oklahoma social workers embroiled in a civil rights action brought by a group of foster kids took the fight to the 10th Circuit on Tuesday, arguing the judge hearing the lawsuit unfairly denied them the shield of qualified immunity. In Juvenile Dependency matter social workers are the crux of the case.  They determine if neglect has occurred through investigation.  They can obtain orders from the Judge if need be to extricate the children from an abusive home.  Here it is alleged they did not take the children from an abusive home and left them with the foster parents who abused them.

Rachel Matthews and several foster children claim their civil rights were violated by 18 employees of the Oklahoma Department of Human Services who failed to intervene and protect the children from their guardians, Deidre and Jerry Matthews.

Over the course of a decade, the social workers dismissed at least 17 reports of abuse filed against the Matthews household in Jay, Oklahoma, including one report that said, “Deidre Matthews was collecting kids like stray animals.” Meanwhile, the Department of Human Services honored the Matthews with its “adoptive parents of the year” award.

Harry Macklowe was in a fist-bumping kind of mood.

As the hours dragged by on Wednesday, the billionaire developer took a breather from his high-stakes divorce proceedings and stepped out of the courtroom briefly, playfully greeting a photographer on his way back in. But Judge Laura Drager wasn’t in the mood, and she chastised Harry after he stopped to peer at a reporter’s laptop.

“Excuse me, Mr. Macklowe, please!” she said.

When it comes to divorce, not all assets are equal
It might be the only thing the two sides in a divorce can easily agree on: it’s no fun.

On top of the emotional toll, financial missteps during the process can leave you in far worse shape than you intended. And the more intertwined you and your spouse’s finances are, the more closely you’ll need to pay attention while untangling them.

Jesse Williams is opening his wallet wide for his estranged wife, to the tune of $160,000. That means that Williams was earning a significant amount more that Aryn his wife.  Spousal support in California is determined by numerous factors according to the family law code.  It takes into account the length of marriage and the incomes of the parties and there capacity to earn a living.

Jesse’s estranged wife, Aryn Drake-Lee, just filed legal docs which disclose a temporary settlement, in which Jesse agrees to give her $100k for spousal and child support and $60k to cover her lawyer’s fees and other costs.  Attorney fees are dealt with on an as need basis.

He has to pay her in 3 installments from his first 3 “Grey’s Anatomy” paychecks.

ASHLAND, Ky. (CN) – Two lawsuits against Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis – who refused to marry same-sex couples after the historic U.S. Supreme Court ruling legalizing gay marriage – will proceed, but only against Davis in her individual capacity, a federal judge ruled.  That measns that the federal that passed will allow same sex couples the same rights concerning divorce as other not same sex couples.

Davis, clerk of Rowan County, Ky., spent five days in jail in 2015 after she was held in contempt of court for refusing to issue marriage licenses for same-sex couples, following the Supreme Court’s landmark decision in Obergefell v. Hodges. She claimed her beliefs as an Apostolic Christian prevented her from sanctioning the unions.

In a pair of 21-page rulings issued Friday, U.S. District Court Judge David L. Bunning disagreed with Davis’ assertion that her policy created a “mere inconvenience” to gay couples – whom she said could have traveled to another county to obtain licenses – and refused to dismiss personal-capacity claims against her.

Rob Kardashian has agreed to pay $20,000 a month in child support, ending a vicious custody battle with his former fiancée, Blac Chyna.

As part of the agreement, Chyna dropped her domestic violence allegations against the reality TV star

The pair had announced their engagement and pregnancy in May 2016, then split a month later. A month after the baby was born in November, Kardashian wrote in an Instagram post that Chyna had taken the baby and left his home.

Veteran financial fraud investigators had never seen anything like it before: A bankruptcy scam in which an Indiana woman stole her husband’s identity—while they were still married—and began to loot his 401(k) retirement fund and other assets.

“This was certainly a unique case,” said Special Agent Doug Kasper, who supervised the investigation from the FBI’s Indianapolis Division. Even after 58-year-old Patricia Bippus-Allen was sentenced to five years in federal prison in July after pleading guilty to conspiracy to commit bankruptcy fraud, subornation of perjury, wire fraud, and aggravated identity theft, investigators remain uncertain about her motive or what she did with the money.

What is certain, however, is that Bippus-Allen devised an elaborate bankruptcy fraud to gain access to her husband’s wages, and she made multiple unauthorized withdrawals from his 401(k) retirement account—all with the help of her brother, who impersonated her husband.